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Police in Long Island serial killer case reveal new evidence

Suffolk County Police declined to say exactly where the evidence was found in the nearly decade-old case.

NEW YORK — Investigators stymied by a nine-year mystery following the discovery of 11 sets of human remains near a beach in the New York City area have revealed new evidence in the case.

A previously unreleased photograph was revealed on Thursday as new evidence found at one of the crime scenes. Investigators say it was handled by an unknown suspect.

The Suffolk County Police Department had searched the Gilgo Beach area on Long Island after the remains had been strewn along a suburban New York beach highway.

The new evidence, a photograph, shows the initials on a belt, either an HM or WH, depending on the angle. 

County Police Commissioner Geraldine Hart declined to say exactly where the belt was found. Hart showed the photograph during a press conference at police headquarters in Yaphank.

Credit: AP
Suffolk County Police Commissioner Geraldine Hart shows a photograph with the initials on a belt, showing either an HM or WH, depending on the angle, during a press conference at police headquarters in Yaphank , N.Y., Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020. Investigators stymied by a nine-year mystery following the discovery of 11 sets of human remains strewn along a suburban New York beach highway revealed a previously unreleased photograph Thursday of evidence found at one of the crime scenes that they say was handled by an unknown suspect. (James Carbone/Newsday via AP)

The case that has attracted national headlines is about to be shown in a new spotlight when Netflix releases "Lost Girls," a film about the unsolved killings, in March.

The Associated Press reports that Hart said authorities are setting up a new website, gilgonews.com, which will post updates on the investigation and accept tips about the case. 

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