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Summer temperatures bring potential safety risks for people and pets

Taking breaks, staying hydrated, staying out of the sun during the hottest parts of the day can all help mitigate heat illnesses.

BOISE, Idaho — As temperatures hit 100 degrees, safety is of utmost importance.

“Anything we do, we’re going to make sure that the safety of our participants is top of mind,” Boise Parks and Recreation director Doug Holloway said.  

Extreme heat is here to stay – at least for the rest of the week. Holloway said Boise Parks and Recreation is prepared. Parks and Recreation serves up to 7,000 children every summer. 

With all the seasonal programming, the group is continuously finding ways to beat the heat.

RELATED: Extreme heat is here; know the warning signs of heat-related illness

“Once we start getting into the 90s, we will be really cognizant of what that could do with kids playing outdoors,” he said. “We’ll adjust a lot of our activities, where they’ll be more passive activities. We’ll spend a lot more time in the shade, a lot more time under shelters or under shade structures.”

Those passive activities include board games and art projects. And when it gets to those triple degree days, Holloway said being indoors is the way to go. Parks and Recreation has alternative indoor sites for each of their camps when the heat is too much.

St. Luke’s Hospital Dr. Jason Bronner said making sure your kids take breaks can help prevent heat illnesses. Holloway agrees.  

“You know your child better than we do. So, if you feel uncomfortable of sending you child to one of our outdoor activities because the weather is so warm. You know, that’s perfectly fine,” Holloway said. “We highly suggest and strongly suggest you keep them at home for that period of time.”

Humans aren’t the only ones affected by high temperatures. They also take a toll on pets. Here’s a slogan to remember - it’s even hotter on the ground.  According to a Idaho Humane Society Facebook post, if it’s 77 degrees out, asphalt and tarmac can reach 125 degrees.

To avoid burning your dog’s paws, walk early in the morning or late in the evening. Keep to natural grass or invest in a pair of booties.

The Human Society also said people should follow the seven-second rule. Hold the back of your hand on the pavement for seven seconds. If it’s too hot for you, it’s too hot for you dog.

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