x

Boise's Leading Local News: Weather, Traffic, Sports and more | Boise, Idaho | KTVB.com

Boise School District preparing for online learning

District officials say they plan to launch a specific grade-level online curriculum for each student in mid-April.
Credit: KTVB file
Boy reads in class in the Boise School District

BOISE, Idaho — The Boise School District is working to put together a plan for students to be able to learn online as the coronavirus outbreak continues to keep schools closed. 

In a message sent out Monday, Superintendent Colby Dennis wrote that although remote schooling can not totally replace in-classroom learning, the district wants students to be as prepared as they can be moving forward. 

Starting this week, teachers in the Boise School District will begin reaching out to parents of Boise students to check in about how families are doing, and figure out whether they have access to the internet, and to a computer or electronic device other than a smartphone. 

That information is "critical" as the district moves ahead with launching grade-specific lessons by mid-April, Dennis wrote.

Idaho COVID-19 latest:  Latest news Map of confirmed Idaho cases | Stay-at-home order details | COVID-19 resources | Testing sites | Employers hiring | Essential business list | Closings | School closings Help nonprofitsFull COVID-19 coverage   

Beginning on Monday, March 30 and continuing for the next ten days, the district will be uploading grade-level educational resources and activities onto the Learning & Essential Services website. The materials are aimed at teaching students in core subjects, and helping families set up a routine for learning at home. 

For those who do not have access to the internet, printed packets will be available at the grab-and-go meal sites. 

RELATED: What's an 'essential' business under the Idaho stay-home order? Gov. Little answers your questions

In mid-April, the Boise School District will launch a specific online curriculum for each student enrolled in the district. Once more, alternative printed lessons will be available for those without internet. Teachers will be able to provide help and feedback to students through online tools once this phase begins, according to school officials. 

"Like you, we are doing our very best to navigate an unprecedented situation. We are grateful for the community-minded parents, colleagues, partners, and many others who are helping to support our children," Dennis wrote. "We know many of you are feeling anxious and uncertain about the future. We are here for you, whether it’s our stay-at-home learning plan, our Grab-And-Go Meal Services For Children, or connecting you with community resources and student support services."

Anyone with school-specific questions should reach out to their child's principal, while answers to more general questions are available here.