Paramedics warn of heat-related illnesses as temperatures soar

How you can stay cool during the heat wave.

BOISE - We're looking at 100-degree temperatures for most of the week, and for those of you planning on being outside, it’s important to know when your body is overheating.

Spending too much time in the hot weather can lead to heat exhaustion or even worse, heat stroke.

“I played football my whole life during the middle of the summer, I got really dizzy, light headed and started throwing up,” said Jacob Newby, who suffered from a heat stroke.

It’s something Ada County Paramedics see a lot of in the summer.

”Something as quick as a 20-minute bike ride out in 90 plus degree weather, it can dehydrate you and make you feel dizzy and even pass out,” said paramedic Linda Scopelliti.

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So when you are outside this summer, swimming, paddle boarding, or just under the sun in general, it’s important to stay hydrated.

But drinking water just when you're outside isn't enough.

“You need to start drinking before you get outside, usually a liter an hour while you're outside sweating and then keep hydrating on top of that while you’re out working in the yard, playing in the sun," said Scopelliti.  "Apply sun block, make you're covering up your body and your skin.

"The burns from the sun as well will cause you to have some problems with the heat and  being able to regulate your body temperature," she added.

All of this can help you avoid heat exhaustion, which causes severe sweating, redness, thirst and even dizziness.

If you experience any of those symptoms, it’s time to get indoors.

“For heat exhaustion, we want people to find a cool place to sit down, relax, try and hydrate," Scopelliti said.
"Sports drinks can be helpful as well."

Otherwise heat exhaustion can quickly turn into a heat stroke.

“If you can’t keep anything down, if you’re not able to hydrate, vomiting, you need to seek medical attention, if you stand up and start to feel light headed, give us a call that's what were here for," said Scopelliti. "The younger population and the older population are going to be more effected quicker, they don't have the ability to regulate their body temperatures as easily. Inside in the air conditioning is going to be your fastest way to cool off."

© 2017 KTVB-TV


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