Russian authorites block Nampa family from adopting 4-year-old boy

Russian authorites block Nampa family from adopting 4-year-old boy

Print
Email
|

by Justin Corr

Bio | Email | Follow: @JCorrKTVB

KTVB.COM

Posted on January 17, 2013 at 10:07 AM

Updated Monday, Nov 25 at 12:42 AM

MOSCOW, Russia -- A Nampa family is stuck in Russia on the final trip in the long process to adopt a 4-year-old boy named Gabriel.

The Preece family is now in limbo, not sure if recently passed laws will keep them from bringing their new son home.

"Obviously we're very emotionally upset and we just want to be able to take our child home with us," said Becky Preece.

We first introduced you to Nampa's Becky and Brian Preece in July, when they were in the middle of trying to adopt 4-year-old Gabriel. They arrived in Moscow on Sunday, and expected to bring Gabriel home with them. Soon after arriving, they learned that wouldn't happen -- at least yet.

"Obviously we're extremely, extremely heartbroken," said Becky.

Earlier this month, Russia passed a law banning Americans from adopting Russian children in response to a new U.S. law targeting Russian human rights violators. The Preeces' adoption has already been approved by a Russian court. However, Becky says along with 51 other families with finalized adoptions, they're not being allowed to take custody or leave the country with their kids.

"We have done everything ethically and legally, and they have been declared ours by their own court system and we just want to bring them homes to our families," said Becky Preece.

Brian has to come back to Idaho on Saturday. But Becky says she and a friend also trying to adopt in Moscow are not going anywhere. "We plan on staying as long as we have to, until we get some kind of answer or resolution."

Becky says they have been able to see Gabriel twice this week, but it was so difficult not to take him with, when they left.

"We're frustrated," said Becky. "We just think about him, and about the other kids that are in the same position, and were expecting their parents to come. These poor children are so confused, 'Why can't I go with you?'"

Becky says when they first arrived in Russia, they were hoping to 'lie low', and try to get in, get out, and try to avoid the politics. However, that obviously didn't happen. So now, to try to affect change, they're trying to get the word out. So far, that's worked. The Preeces' story has been covered all over the world.

So what's next? The Preeces say they will appeal the local judge's decision not to allow them to take custody of Gabriel. They expect that will be denied, and are truly waiting on a directive from the Russian Supreme Court. They expect that, hopefully, in the next two weeks.

 

 

Print
Email
|