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BOISE -- Some are calling it a new cultural landmark, and construction hasn't even begun yet.

Construction is about to get underway on a new community center coming to downtown Boise, near the bottom of the Connector, near 9th and Front streets.

Starting in the summer 2014, drivers will begin seeing the new JUMP Project as they come into the city. It's expected to be a local working space for artists, innovators, and non-profits to meet.

Before construction can begin on the JUMP project, crews must first tear down an existing structure. Wade Lambert, who is overseeing the project, wants to do something different. He's planning to recycle the roof of the 40-year-old building and use it for a new warehouse.

For the most part the beams are in pretty good shape, wood is in pretty good shape, these older buildings were built stronger than the newer buildings, said Lambert.

Lambert says its the first time he's done anything like this, though he's been doing this elsewhere to promote sustainability -- and as a cost saving measure.

It's easier to come in and rebuild this than to buy new materials, and new materials are going up dramatically on the cost, said Lambert.

Once construction is completed, Dan Drinkward says that the JUMP project will be one-of-a-kind.

It's a architecturally unique project that's gonna be a real feature in the city of Boise, it's gonna be the first thing you see when you come in off the Connector, something from a programming stand point doesn't exist here, said Drinkward.

Kathy O'Neill, a programs coordinator for JUMP, is glad they didn't just tear down an old building for the complex and says the new structure which will offer space for classes, innovators, and non profits to meet. It will definitely help people in the future.

It's really going to transform the community of Boise into a new center for creativity and innovation, said O'Neill.

Constructions crews will continue removing the rest of the 40 panels, weighing nearly 3,700 pounds each, over the next few days. Once that's finished, they'll begin the next phase. That is excavating the ground and laying down the footprint to build up above ground level.

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