High school girl rallies classmates to help premature babies

High school girl rallies classmates to help premature babies

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by Maggie O'Mara

Bio | Email | Follow: @maggiektvb7

KTVB.COM

Posted on January 30, 2012 at 10:07 AM

Updated Monday, Jan 30 at 3:35 PM

BOISE -- A 15-year-old girl at Rocky Mountain High school is showing that you are never too young to start giving back.

Kayla Blaisdell is leading a project to at her school to gather blankets to donate to premature babies at our local hospitals.  She calls the effort "Rocky Fighting For Preemies" and it is raising awareness for the March of Dimes.

"We did a blanket drive at our school, so we got a whole bunch of donated blankets and we're donating them to hospitals in Idaho," explained Kayla.

She even had the chance to meet some of the moms and babies at St. Alphonsus while she dropped off dozens of blankets.

Baby Tennyson was born seven weeks early.  She is gaining weight, but her mom still is not sure when they will be able to go home.

"They tell us that it could be up until my due date, which was February 23.  So we are just taking it one day at a time," said Kelcey Stewart, Tennyson's mother.

"I've always just had something with preemies, I feel bad that they have to be in here so long and their parents have to go through so much, so I just wanted to help," said Kayla.  "I learned that blankets can help them recreate the womb."
 
"It's amazing and heartfelt that someone would want to do that for these babies in NICU, not to mention somebody that's in high school," said Kelcy.  "It just makes you feel good as a mom that there is love behind that quilt."

Kayla and her classmates have helped to donate about 140 blankets, but that isn't all Kayla has planned for her school. 

"We are going to do a coin drive in March for March of Dimes," she said.

In the average week in Idaho, 484 babies are born and 47 of those are born early.

The March of Dimes works to help moms have full-term pregnancies and helps support families with premature babies.

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