Parents warned after teen killed 'hill hopping'

Parents warned after teen killed 'hill hopping'

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by KGW and AP staff

KTVB.COM

Posted on June 11, 2013 at 3:09 PM

Updated Tuesday, Jun 11 at 3:25 PM

JEFFERSON, Ore.  -- Police were urging parents to talk to their teens about the dangers of "hill-hopping" after a teenager died over the weekend.

Nicolas Jolly, 19, was killed after going on a high-speed joyride when his car flew into a power pole and was sheared in half. 

Deputies say they found the entire front end of the 1995 Honda Civic, including the engine, front windshield and dashboard, about 100 feet away from the rest of the car Saturday night. The driver, Nicolas J. Jolly, was dead at the scene.

One passenger, 19-year-old Douglass Curtiss, of Turner, sustained only minor injuries, but the other, 19-year-old Juan Barrera, of Jefferson, was admitted to Salem Hospital with serious injuries.

Just last month, four teens crashed but survived while hill hopping, the term used to describe areas where drivers can get up speed and use a hill to get their car airborne.

On Monday, a Marion County Deputy urged parents to talk to their teens about the danger of the practice.

"When you have a teenage kid with two to three years of driving experience, they don' really understand the dynamics of hill hopping," said Don Thompson. "Get them to realize that some of these are life-changing, and you can't go back and do it over, it's not like a video game that you can just hit reset."

Barrera released a statement to KGW from the hospital Sunday.

“Nicholas Jolly was a good kid, a good friend and a great student. My thoughts are now for his family. I am doing okay. Doctors plan to monitor my condition day to day. I am sorry this happened. Everyone should learn a lesson from this crash. It’s not all fun and games. Bad things can happen. It doesn’t matter who you are. I want people out there to not make the same mistake,” he said.

The passengers told deputies they went for a drive on Valley View Road because it was like a roller coaster. They said Jolly was driving between 90 and 100 mph when the car "caught air" and struck the pole. They were wearing seat belts, but the driver's side airbag never deployed.

It wasn't immediately clear who owned the car.

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