Boise mayor unveils $34M bond to expand parks, public space, fire and police

Mayor Bieter's 2013 State of the City address

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by KTVB

KTVB.COM

Posted on August 8, 2013 at 11:22 AM

Updated Friday, Aug 9 at 6:32 AM

BOISE – Boise Mayor Dave Bieter unveiled a $34 million bond proposal today that he says will enhance public safety, improve and expand city parks, and protect natural areas, wildlife habitat and clean water.

The city plans to present the proposals to the public at three open houses later this month.

The mayor says his office has been working on this list of projects for several years.

He says improving public safety and adding parks and open space will be needed for Boise's future.

"We found that some very important needs of the city, capital needs, we could not address with our existing revenues, said Bieter.

That's why he is proposing a $34 million package to give several aspects of the city a facelift.

The plan would involve the construction of a new training facility for firefighters. It would also include rebuilding or remodeling three fire stations, and relocating another station.

A new central district police station would be added downtown as well, but the current headquarters in west Boise will stay open.

"We really want presence in all areas of the city, so it's easier to access for our citizens and better for our officers, said Bieter.

Fire Chief Dennis Doan supports the plan and says fire stations, like one downtown, are simply too old and need major improvements.

As for the training facility, it's so outdated, it won't even be certified much longer.

"It's time for us to invest in them, our training facility is over 50 years old and doesn't serve needs of citizens," said Doan.

The proposal also involves preserving more than 10,000 acres of open space in the foothills in three main areas -- Tablerock, the Military Reserve, and the Dry Creek area.

If approved, the plan would also improve three parks, build two more parks -- one near the Flying Wye and the other off Fairview Avenue -- and purchase land for another park.

Park and Recreation tells us the money is needed to keep Boise known as a livable city.

"The feedback we have gotten is that there appears to be great support for something like this," said Doug Holloway, Boise Parks and Recreation Director.

City officials estimate the $34 million bond package would cost the average homeowner around $13 per year.

The city will present more details on the proposed projects at three open houses on August 19, 21, and 22.

- Monday, August 19, 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

MORLEY NELSON COMMUNITY CENTER
7701 W. Northview St., Boise

- Wednesday, August 21, 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

GRACE JORDAN COMMUNITY CENTER
6411 W. Fairfield Ave., Boise

- Thursday, August 22, 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

BOISE CITY HALL – 3rd Floor Council Chambers
150 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise

Residents can also submit comments to the Mayor and City Council at MayorandCouncil@CityofBoise.org or by calling the Mayor’s Office at 208-384-4422.

After the open houses, the Boise City Council will consider whether to place the bond on the November ballot.

Here is a complete break down of the bond proposal:

PUBLIC SAFETY, PARKS & NATURAL AREAS PROJECT LIST
August 8, 2013

A. PUBLIC SAFETY

 

1.    FIRE TRAINING FACILITY
Construction of a new training facility to meet the National Fire Protection Association’s minimum standards for training new firefighters. The new facility would be located on existing city property near the City’s West Boise Wastewater treatment facility. Facility would conform to current seismic, environmental and energy standards and would allow fire fighters to be trained to handle modern building specifications.
COST: $6,850,000

2.    FIRE STATION 4
Rebuild existing station on Ustick Road to allow the placement of a ladder truck, a critical element of fire response that will greatly expand the fire response capabilities in this highly populated area. Original station built in 1972.
REPLACEMENT COST: $2,554,000

3.    FIRE STATION 5
Rebuild existing downtown station at 16th Street to prevent further deterioration of the building and to ensure high level of service as the city grows. Current facility was built in 1951 and is seismically unsafe and ten years past its useful life. This station gets more calls than any other station in Idaho and is the oldest active station in Boise.
COST: $2,500,000

4.    FIRE STATION 8
Relocation of this station (currently at Overland and Roosevelt Street) to improve response coverage on the Central Bench and at Boise State University. Existing station built in 1956.
REPLACEMENT COST: $3,200,000.

5.    FIRE STATION 9
Remodel existing station at State and Collister to bring it up to seismic, ADA and fire standards and improve overall readiness. Built in 1975, the station does not meet building safety requirements, lacking both fire suppression equipment and the alarm system required by city code.
COST: $1,300,000.

6.    CENTRAL DISTRICT POLICE STATION
Currently all police officers have to report to City Hall West at the western edge of the city before going on duty. The Central District station would increase the accessibility of community oriented police services and ensure safety in the rapidly growing downtown core.
COST: $1,950,000 (which will be added to the available $1,950,000 in million in impact fees for a total project cost of $3,900,000)

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY COST: $18,354,000

B. OPEN SPACE
The $10 million Foothills Serial levy passed in 2001 has been leveraged to preserve over 10,763 acres of open space valued at over $37.4 million. The city’s proposal would add an additional $10 million dollars to replenish the open space fund and allow for the purchase of more natural areas in the Boise Foothills and other parts of the City, linking critical trail networks, preserving wildlife habitat and protecting the delicate Boise water shed.

TOTAL OPEN SPACE COST: $10,000,000

C. PARKS

1.    LIBERTY PARK
520 N. Liberty Street, off Emerald St. near St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center
Develop an additional 2.5 acres of the park and add amenities including little league and other sports facilities, picnic shelters and restrooms.
COST: $835,000

2.    FRANKLIN PARK
Franklin & Orchard streets
Development of a three acre parcel, pending acquisition from the Boise School District, to be used as a neighborhood park for this densely populated area that currently does not meet city standards for neighborhood parks.
COST: $760,000

3.    BORAH PARK
801 S. Aurora Drive, near Borah High School
Develop four acres of additional park space and add amenities including volleyball court, pathways, open-play fields and a dog-off-leash area.
COST: $525,000

4.    MILWAUKEE PARK
3950 N. Milwaukee Street, near Capital High School
Addition of amenities to the existing park including a picnic shelter, restroom, playground, basketball court and facilities to better accommodate youth baseball games.
COST: $335,000

5.    PINE GROVE PARK
8995 W. Shoup Drive, near Maple Grove and the Flying Wye
Development of a four-acre site in West Boise into a fully functional park. Amenities to include picnic shelters, playground, restroom, basketball courts, improved dog park and parking.
COST: $1,129,339

6.    STERLING PARK
9851 W Irving St., off Fairview between Maple Grove and Five Mile roads
Develop an eight acre property in West Boise into a fully functional park. Amenities would include picnic shelter, playground, tennis court, basketball court, improved dog park, and a water spray pad feature.
COST: $1,893,636
PARKS TOTAL: $5,477,975


TOTAL BOND COST: $33,831,975
 

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