Arizona immigration law spurs education campaign

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Associated Press

Posted on September 19, 2012 at 3:01 PM

PHOENIX (AP) — A hot line set up by civil rights advocates has been fielding calls from people in Arizona who want to know their rights if they are questioned about their immigration status.

A judge yesterday ruled that police can immediately start enforcing the most contentious provision of Arizona's immigration law -- the so-called "show me your papers" provision. It requires officers, while enforcing other laws, to question the immigration status of those who are suspected of being in the country illegally.

Rallies are planned around Phoenix to protest the law. Civil rights activists contend it will lead to systematic racial profiling.

One Mexican woman who is in the country illegally says she's been telling other immigrants that they should offer only their name and date of birth -- and carry no documents that show where they were born.

Advocates are asking people who are affected by the provision to keep a record of abuses. They're also urging police departments not to enforce the provision as a way to gain cooperation from immigrants in reporting crimes.

%@AP Links

091-a-13-(Alessandra Soler (ah-leh-SAHN'-drah soh-LEHR'), executive director, American Civil Liberties Union of Arizona, in AP interview)-"in illegal detentions"-Alessandra Soler, with the American Civil Liberties Union of Arizona, says her group is collecting evidence to show the so-called "show me your papers" provision of Arizona's immigration law is leading to racial profiling and other abuses. (19 Sep 2012)

<<CUT *091 (09/19/12)>> 00:13 "in illegal detentions"

092-a-08-(Alessandra Soler ah-leh-SAHN'-drah soh-LEHR', executive director, American Civil Liberties Union of Arizona, in AP interview)-"defend their rights"-Alessandra Soler, with the American Civil Liberties Union of Arizona, says the so-called "show me your papers" provision of Arizona's immigration law is leading to civil rights abuses. (19 Sep 2012)

<<CUT *092 (09/19/12)>> 00:08 "defend their rights"

APPHOTO NY112: FILE - In this July 29, 2010 file photo, Maricopa County Sheriff's deputies, left, check the shoes of a suspect arrested during a crime suppression sweep in Phoenix. A judge in Arizona on Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2012 ruled that police can immediately start enforcing the most contentious section of the state's immigration law, marking the first time officers can carry out the so-called "show me your papers" provision. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File) (30 Jul 2010)

<<APPHOTO NY112 (07/30/10)>>

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