A community chips in to help struggling women

Credit: Eric Turner/ KTVB

A community chips in to help struggling women

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by Scott Evans

Bio | Email | Follow: @ScottEvansKTVB

KTVB.COM

Posted on December 6, 2012 at 11:56 PM

Updated Thursday, Dec 5 at 4:30 PM

TWIN FALLS -- Community Cares Day is so close you can almost smell it. We at Channel 7 are excited for what we have in store this year. This is will be our fifth year doing raising money and food for four very deserving charities.

Here we take a closer look at one of those organizations on the receiving end of Cares Day, the Jubilee House. We also look at those who help it run year-round.

Jubilee, it's a celebration; it's a reason to rejoice. Tucked in the back corner of a big, empty dirt lot in Twin Falls, what is going on inside the Jubilee House is a reason to celebrate. Inside, women are working to get their lives back on track.

"We deal with abuse and we deal with neglect and we deal with false beliefs, and healing is what we do here I guess," said Kathryn Bausman, the director of Jubilee House.

Bausman opened the Jubilee House almost five years ago. She calls it a full life recovery program.

At any given time, she has eight to eleven women living in this home. Her program pays for everything, room board and transportation, all of that with a budget of $100,000.

"We can keep it that low because of volunteers and donations," said Bausman.

Donors like Karen Luker.

"I donate my food, my time, my love, my support," said Luker. And when her budget allows, she donates money as well.

"I'm a giving person and my goal is to bless others," said Luker.

"That simple huh?" asked KTVB's Scott Evans.

"Yes. I love to give. I was raised in a very giving family. I came from a very poor family, but we always gave," said Luker.

Barbie Danson has spent nearly 30 years in recovery programs like the Jubilee House.

"We've seen a lot of them that are really good, but this one, it just, it was working. I saw the changes in the girls. I saw the growth that was happening," said Danson.

She is at the house every Sunday afternoon.

"We started out mainly with just donating financially,” said Danson. “But then I realized that I needed to start doing more. I wanted to be more involved."

It's the little donations of time, money and food that Bausman says is so critical to their mission.

"The backbone of our financial support are people that give $10 to $20 a month on a consistent basis,” said Bausman. “That's what makes it possible to pay our monthly bills.”

It's those donors, Bausman says, who some months have kept the Jubilee House doors open when they otherwise would have been forced to close.

"How do you thank the donors? I don't know, because how do you thank someone for saving someone's life?" said Bausman.

As it happens with most people who give, they get something in return as well.

"I'm just one blessed lady to be a part of this,” said Danson. “They don't know what they do for me.”

The fifth annual Cares Day will take place December 8, 2012 from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.

KTVB will broadcast live and accept donations at the Idaho Center in Nampa, KTVB Studio in Boise, and Fred Meyer stores in Twin Falls and Eagle.

All donations will be split among the Idaho Foodbank, Salvation Army of Ada County, Nampa, Caldwell, and Twin Falls, Jubilee House, Boise Rescue Mission, Lighthouse Rescue Mission, and City Light Home for Women and Children.

We will be accepting non-perishable food items and cash donations to help Idaho families in need.

If you cannot make it to the event but would like to help, you can make a secure $10 donation by texting 7CARES to 50555 from your mobile phone, click here to choose an amount to give online, tap on Cares Day in any of KTVB apps, or go to our Facebook page.

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