Will Idaho's newest gold medalist get her own ski run?

Credit: James Lang-USA TODAY Sports

Feb 13, 2014; Sochi, RUSSIA; Kaitlyn Farrington (USA) holds up her gold medal during the medal ceremony for the ladies' halfpipe at the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games at the Medals Plaza. Mandatory Credit: James Lang-USA TODAY Sports

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by Matt Standal and Jamie Grey

Bio | Email | Follow: @KTVBMatt

KTVB.COM

Posted on February 13, 2014 at 2:04 PM

Updated Thursday, Feb 13 at 2:50 PM

SUN VALLEY, Idaho -- As the world's newest Olympic halfpipe champion, 24-year-old Idaho native Kaitlyn Farrington gained instant notoriety worldwide.

After the win, Farrington was celebrated by countless fans on TV and social media, treated to a celebrity interview on NBC's TODAY Show, and will be honored by those in the Wood River Valley, where she grew up.

In fact, odds are Idaho's famous Sun Valley Resort will name a ski run after her.

That's because not only did Kaitlyn grow up learning how to ski on Bald Mountain, but Sun Valley Resort has a unique tradition of naming runs after local Olympians.

Four Olympic medalists from Sun Valley have runs named after them, including Gretchen Fraser, Christin Cooper, Picabo Street, and paralympian Muffy Davis.

That's why KTVB wanted to know:  will Sun Valley Resort change the name of a run to honor the area's newest Olympic champion?

Resort spokesman Jack Sibbach says it's a good possibility.

"It's a longstanding tradition to name a run after a medalist here - an Olympic medalist at Sun Valley - and it's a tradition I'd like to continue, not only for Kaitlyn but in the future for many more athletes from the Wood River Valley," Sibbach told KTVB's Jamie Grey during a live interview on Thursday morning.

But what run will they rename? Perhaps the Dollar Mountain halfpipe?

Her coaches tell us it's no secret that particular halfpipe is already known as "Kaitlyn's halfpipe." The informal nomenclature owes to the fact that Farrington trained there for several years while developing her skills.

As for a celebration for the young medalist, Sibbach assuredly said the community would be holding a big one when Farrington returned.

"We're going to get with her people, as a community, and as a team, and I'm sure they'll be more than one celebration - but one really big official celebration," he said.

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