Stage I fire restrictions start Thursday -- what does that mean?

Credit: Zach Stotland/ KTVB

Stage I fire restrictions start Thursday -- what does that mean?

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by Associated Press & KTVB.COM

KTVB.COM

Posted on July 29, 2013 at 12:03 PM

Updated Tuesday, Jul 30 at 6:59 AM

BOISE -- Forest managers are ordering heightened fire restrictions on public and private land in central and southwestern Idaho, a response to hot, dry conditions and very high wildfire danger.

Mallory Eils with the Bureau of Land Management tells us what this means to you, the recreationalist. 

“A rock fire ring out in the middle of the forest, that kind of thing doesn’t work," Eils told KTVB. "It needs to be in one of those metal or concrete fire rings that's been provided by the agency that's in charge of the land you are on."

Eils also said, these restrictions also apply to smokers. “Make sure that you are only smoking inside your vehicle, or in a designated recreation or campground.”

Beginning Thursday, Stage 1 fire restrictions go into effect on the Boise, Payette and Sawtooth National Forests, as well as all private, state and Bureau of Land Management-protected territory within Ada, Boise, Canyon, Elmore, Gem, Owyhee, Payette, Washington counties.

Also included in the Stage 1 fire restrictions are portions of Idaho, Adams, Valley, Custer, Elmore, Camas and Blaine counties. Click here for Idaho's Fire Restriction Map.

State 1 fire restrictions include:

  • Building, maintaining, attending or using a fire, campfire, stove fire except within an agency designated recreation site and only within an agency provided structure, or on a private citizen’s own land and only within an owner-provided permanent structure.
  • Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building or designated recreation site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.

Read Idaho's 2013 Fire Restrictions Plan here.

At Grayback Gulch in the Boise National Forest we found Bill and Lorene Schaudt, who were camping for the night.

"We love camping, we've been doing it for 40 years,” said the Schaudts."We obviously feel strongly about concern for the season when it gets this volatile."

Although starting a fire where they are camping is legal, because it is in a designated camp ring, they also say they know the importance of maintaining a campfire and making sure it’s out.

"We've taken groups of students camping and always, it’s always in a fire pit. Everything is put out before everybody hits the hay and a double check in the morning before we leave, extremely important,” said the couple.

Meanwhile, numerous fires continue to burn in Idaho, nearly all of them are in remote areas where no structures are threatened.

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