Hundreds race to help Horseshoe Bend schools

Credit: Eric Turner / KTVB

Hundreds race to help Horseshoe Bend schools

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by Justin Corr

Bio | Email | Follow: @JCorrKTVB

KTVB.COM

Posted on September 29, 2012 at 4:09 PM

Updated Thursday, Dec 5 at 1:42 AM

HORSESHOE BEND, Idaho -- Hundreds ran and walked to help schools in Horseshoe Bend on Saturday, with the Race 2 the Summit.

Earlier this year, two different school levies failed in Horseshoe Bend. Many voters there didn't believe money from a 2010 levy was spent wisely, and they didn't want to see their taxes go up.

It meant cuts to physical education and athletics.

"They cut PE this year, because the two levies failed," said Lillie Crawford, a mother who lives in Horseshoe Bend.

Crawford, and two other moms in Horseshoe Bend, were very disappointed when the district had to make cuts, but resolved to do something about it. That 'something' was the Race 2 the Summit.

"It's very emotional. I was in tears all morning," said Crawford, as she handed out medals at the finish line.

The Race was a half-marathon, 10k and 5k up Old Highway 55. Most of the materials were donated, there were numerous sponsors, and all proceeds will go to helping fund programs that were cut, like physical education.

"We wanted to have these kids understand that it's fun, it's energetic, and it's really healthy to get up off the couch, and to move," said Crawford.

The Race drew people from across the Valley who wanted to test their mettle on the challenging course, and just help out.

"I just felt that we could help out the smaller communities, and this is one way I could contribute," said Dean Bake, a Meridian dad who ran the 10k.

"With a small town like this, it's kind of difficult sometimes to get the awareness and the funds that they need," said Amber Jessa, a Boisean who walked the 5k. "So, I wanted to contribute."

Jim Kerbein and his family was walking and running for Steve Helm, the voice of the Mustangs who passed away this year.

"He was important to us, and we want to carry on the tradition, and we support the school, because it's our kids," said Kerbein.

Jim, like many in the community, didn't necessarily support the levy. But like everyone in this race, he wanted to make sure to support the kids. "They need as much support as they can get."

"I am just so proud of each and every one of these people for getting up early, coming out here and supporting our cause," said Crawford.

Race organizers say about 400 people competed, raising thousands of dollars. They also say, the race will be back next year.

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