Meridian man falls prey to Russian 'forwarding scam'

Meridian man falls prey to Russian 'forwarding scam'

Credit: Paul Boehlke/KTVB

Meridian man falls prey to Russian 'forwarding scam'

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KTVB.COM

Posted on March 16, 2013 at 3:16 PM

Updated Saturday, Mar 16 at 7:42 PM

BOISE -- A Meridian man's life has been upside down for a quite awhile. Unemployed, working odd jobs, and trying to take care of his ailing wife, he thought he'd found a great opportunity to be close to home and earn extra money.

That is until there was a knock at his door.

The Better Business Bureau's Dale Dixon says the man got much more than he bargained for. His identity isn't being released for privacy reasons.

"The man said he posted his résumé on www.monster.com and was contacted by a company offering employment as a shipping agent," Dixon said.

Dixon said the man would receive the correspondence and packages at his home address, photograph and scan the received packages and documents, repack the goods, and print the customs documents and prepaid shipping labels. He would then send the documents to a third address in California for reimbursement and payment.

The salary was $500 a month, in addition to $30 for every processed letter and $50 for every processed box. The package he shipped went to an address in Russia.

Eventually, the man's home was raided by the FBI, U.S. Postal Inspectors, and countless other law enforcement officials who wanted to charge him with conspiracy, possession of stolen property, and assorted other minor charges.

"They said I was working for the 'Russian Mafia,'" the man said. "I was scared to death."

Dixon said the man began receiving up to seven packages per day before the FBI stepped in to tell him that he was shipping the merchandise to the scammers.

Better Business Bureau reports every year on job seekers who are lured into what is known as a "reshipping scam" or "forwarding scam."  This scam usually involves foreign criminals that buy merchandise with stolen or counterfeit credit card and then hire U.S. citizens to ship it overseas.

To avoid these pitfalls, it's a good idea to take the following precautions:

  • Avoid job listings that use descriptions like: "package forwarding," "reshipping," "money transfers," "wiring funds" and "foreign agent agreements."
  • Do not be fooled by official-sounding corporate names. Some scam artists work under names that sound like those of long-standing, reputable firms. In some cases the scam artists will use a company's information that has recently gone out of business.
  • Never forward or transfer money from any of your personal accounts for your employer. Also, be suspicious if you are asked to "wire" money to an employer. If a legitimate job requires you to make money transfers, the money should be withdrawn from the employer's business account, not yours.
  • Do not give out your personal financial information. A potential legitimate employer will not ask your bank account, credit card or PayPal account number. Only give your banking information if you are hired by a legitimate company and you choose to have your paycheck direct deposited.
  • Do not fax copies of your ID or Social Security number to someone you have never met. Credit checks and fake IDs can be obtained with this information. Only give these documents to your employer when you are physically at the place of employment.

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