Cyclists take 'one last ride' to honor man killed

Supporters gather around a white "ghost bike" memorial to cyclist Victor Haskell who was hit and killed on State Street in Boise.

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by Andrea Lutz and KTVB.COM

Bio | Email | Follow: @KTVBandrealutz

KTVB.COM

Posted on October 8, 2013 at 10:01 PM

Updated Wednesday, Oct 9 at 7:32 AM

BOISE – Fifty-three-year-old Victor Haskell was cycling with multiple safety precautions the night he died. Authorities say he was wearing a helmet and had safety lights on his bike. Haskell's friends say say he was even using hand signals -- he always did.

However on September 26, Haskell was hit and killed by the driver of an SUV as his bike approached State Street and 32nd Street in Boise.

The SUV's driver -- 31-year-old Gavin Haley -- eventually told police he got out of his car and looked to see what he struck, but didn’t find anything, so he left.

Haskell was left behind and died.

RIDE OF SILENCE

The cyclists we talked to say Haskell's death is an all-too-familiar happening.

“I have lots of close calls where people have brushed my handle bars and stuff like that .. and I have had close calls where I didn’t see cyclists,” said Bobby Peterson who lives in Boise.

Tuesday, Peterson along with dozens of others gathered in Sunset Park for what’s called a “Ride of Silence” to honor Haskell.

“It’s just important we all watch out for each other,” said David Moorledge, a physician in Eagle.

Petersen and Moorledge did not know Haskell personally, but both love to ride.

“Well I am an avid cyclist, and I heard about it on Facebook today and I thought it would be important to go down and show my support,” explained Peterson.

Jody Gallegos knew Victor from church.

“We all knew he rode his bike, because there it was -- out on the bike rack,” she said.

Victor was humble and unassuming; that is how Gallegos described him.

“One day Father Jerome did suggest that we bring him with us for breakfast, and so we twisted his arm and he finally came,” said Gallegos.

She and the others believe bicycle deaths impact the community. The impact was apparent by all those who showed up Tuesday for the ride to support Haskell’s family and draw awareness.

“We come together as a community and he was a part of our community,” said Mooreledge.

The ride finally ended at 32nd street where now stands a ghost bike. Victor's family was moved by the number of supporters who showed up and Gallegos believes Victor would have been moved too.

“He would be very shocked to find out that the tragedy that cost his life has not generated a bit of a movement.”

A Boise ordinance states that bicyclists must have three feet of space for cars to pass.

A judge set Haley's bond at $250,000, and was also ordered not to drink or possess alcohol or drive, pending the outcome of the case.

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