ACHD works around the clock to treat roads

Credit: Paul Boehlke/ KTVB

ACHD works around the clock to treat roads

Print
Email
|

by Justin Corr

Bio | Email | Follow: @JCorrKTVB

KTVB.COM

Posted on February 7, 2014 at 6:08 PM

BOISE -- For all the snow that dumped on Ada County Friday morning, there weren't a lot of crashes. Through the morning, there were three slide-offs, 17 non-injury crashes, one injury crash and eight hit-and-runs. No one was hurt in those hit-and-runs, as they were situations where people came out to find someone had hit their car.

Some of the thanks for low crash totals goes to the Ada County Highway District crews, who were out the roads since before the storm hit overnight.

"If we have pre-notification of it, we're out pre-treating the roads," said Michael Callaway, who was driving one of the more than two-dozen trucks or plows ACHD can put on Ada County roads, to try to get them as safe as possible.

"We attack it with everything we have. We'll do whatever it takes to make sure we're maintaining the snowfall," said Callaway. "We want to get our main roads open, so emergency response can get to anything, any accidents that have happened... stop signs, intersections, school zones, and then we work on our interior stuff after that."

They plow, use salt, de-icer, and literally tons of sand. Sometimes they have to go back over a road a couple times. Callaway says crews just have to be flexible, "The guys are within five minutes of response time."

However, as the snow keeps falling, the road conditions keep changing, and crews have to keep working.

"The guys on our crews have just done an immaculate job of taking care of our roads," said Callaway.

There are different ways ACHD treats different roads in different areas, to accommodate different traffic, like for instance, in downtown Boise, they only salt.

 

 

 

Print
Email
|