Jubliee House helping women get back on track

Jubliee House helping women get back on track

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by Scott Evans

Bio | Email | Follow: @ScottEvansKTVB

KTVB.COM

Posted on November 25, 2011 at 12:40 PM

TWIN FALLS -- Getting women back on their feet and free from a life of addiction -- that's the goal of the Jubilee House in Twin Falls. They try to to heal open wounds in women recovering from broken lives.

Eight women living under the same roof. Together they cook, eat and pray. While each woman had a different path that led to the home's table, they all have one thing in common. Each is a recovering addict.

"I came here straight out of prison, and I needed to do something different," said Kim Taylor who was addicted to meth and alcohol. "It started with a methamphetamine addiction when I was nine, and over the years it's just progressed."
   
 "I had no other alternatives in life, and I burnt a lot of bridges," said Desiree Green who was using meth for 16 years.

In fact, Green says she burnt every bridge, "I've either been kicked out or I've either just got out and relapsed or I've gone there for the wrong reason."

Every bridge other than one, the Jubilee House.

"My life was hopeless before I came here, and it's brought hope to my life," said Green.

"What we try to do is change people's belief systems," said the executive director of the Jubilee House, Kathryn Bausman. "It's not just about being sober, not about just not taking the next drink, it's about living a life, having a life."

The house opened almost four years ago. Bausman and her staff are helping these women learn there is more to life than substance abuse. They're teaching that there is a higher power.
 
"I'm finding value in myself, through Christ," said Green.
 
"It's not just about turning your addiction over to him. It's turning your life and everything, all the behaviors that got me this far. It's not just about staying sober, it's about changing the behaviors," said Taylor.

Behaviors that got them in trouble with the law.

"I don't want to go back," said Taylor. "Go back where?," asked reporter Scott Evans. "Go back to drinking, to using. I want my kids to be proud of me. I don't want them to be ashamed," replied Taylor.

Each woman finding strength in the support of others.

"We can see each other's hardships and not feel humiliated or ashamed," said Green.

And with that comes self confidence

"I've never felt so much success within six months, and I can't imagine in six more months where I will be, but I know I'll be above where I am today," said Green.

So with each prayer and with each group gathering, they grow.

"True joy, comes from being happy with what you have," said Bausman.

With hopes that the Jubilee House will heal their shattered lives and provide them a soft landing back into society.

"We might not each have the same journey, but our backgrounds are the same. We've all been through a lot of stuff. We're all broken. We're all trying to heal together," said Taylor.

The Jubilee House runs its entire program off of less than $100,000 a year.

They hope to be able to expand and open another house. Right now, they are turning away five to ten women a week because they simply don't have enough room or resources.

If you would like to help, you can text 7Cares to 50555 to donate $10  to the 7Cares fund. The donation will split equally among the Boise Rescue Mission, The Idaho Foodbank, The Jubilee House and The Salvation Army.

For more information about 7Cares Day and Seasons of Hope click here

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